Bacon and Cheddar Scones With a Maple Butter Glaze

These ones are made even more special and delicious with the addition of ramp butter. In my last post rustic ramp and potato tart tart I showed you how to use ramps in a tart. Ramps come into season quick and almost without wanting and are gone even faster. There are several ways to preserve them including making pesto with them and freezing the pesto in ice cube trays- that’s usually my go to. This time I’m preserving it - at least for as long as it last in butter form. I made a compound butter infused with the ramps and it is so delicious and can be used in pasta or on crostini, and basically anywhere you would normally use a savoury butter. That got me thinking of where else I could use this very delicious butter. I have always wanted to add a savoury scone recipe to the blog. The first flavour I thought of was cheddar chive. Such a classic flavour - then I thought what could make that combo even better? - it had to be bacon and so this combo was born. It really was out of necessity as I couldn’t let all this delicious butter go to waste.

Bacon and Cheddar Scones With a Maple Butter Glaze

If you don’t have ramp butter do not worry these are still extremely delicious with just regular butter as well. These are tender and buttery scones with a bit of cheese and bacon in each bite. The key to making sure they are tender and crumbly and delicious (as all scones should be) is to make sure all your ingredients are as cold as can be. The next important thing to remember when making scones is to make sure and not overwork your dough - whether you are using your hands to make them or the food processor. Overworked scones will be a little on the tougher side. Once you remember those two things, your scones with always turn out beautifully.

Bacon and Cheddar Scones With a Maple Butter Glaze

Bacon and Cheddar Scones With a Maple Butter Glaze

How to make ramp butter

Let’s talk about that ramp butter for a second. It’s super easy to make. I decided to sauté my ramps beforehand to soften them a bit and to give them a little extra flavour as opposed to blanching them which is also acceptable. Once your ramps are ready and off the pan and your butter is softened, all you have to do is put it all in your food processor and whiz it around until the ramps have broken down and green butter starts to develop. Easy as that. I usually store some in the fridge to use right away and store the rest in the freezer to use as I need it. It will last a lot longer in the freezer. It’s not only great in these scones, but as I said before its wonderful melted through pasta, risotto and great on a steak our under the skin of a chicken or turkey.

Bacon and Cheddar Scones With a Maple Butter Glaze

Bacon and Cheddar Scones With a Maple Butter Glaze

Bacon and Cheddar Scones With a Maple Butter Glaze

Finally let’s talk about the glaze I chose to use on thee little guys. I chose to do a maple butter glaze because bacon and maple just belong together and savory and sweet combos always have my heart. If they don’t have yours - that is totally fine just leave out the glaze. I dare you to try it anyways though, you might change your mind about it.

Bacon and Cheddar Scones With a Maple Butter Glaze

Recipe


Ingredients

  • 12 ounces, Bacon chopped
  • 2 cups All-purpose Flour
  • 1 Tablespoon Baking Powder
  • 1 teaspoon Salt
  • 2 Tablespoons Bacon Drippings
  • 6 Tablespoons Cold Butter, Diced (I used ramp butter- homemade recipe below)
  • 4 ounces, Sharp Cheddar Cheese, Shredded
  • 2 Cold Eggs
  • ½ cup Cold Heavy Cream, Plus More For Brushing On Scones

For the Glaze

  • 4 Tbsp. (½ stick) Unsalted Butter, cut into a few pieces
  • ¼ c. Pure Maple Syrup
  • ¼ tsp. Salt
  • about 1 c. Powdered Sugar, sifted

Directions

  1. Whisk baking powder, salt, and 2 cups flour in a large bowl.
  2. Add 2 tablespoons of bacon drippings to the flour. Stir together using a fork
  3. Using the large holes on a box grater, grate in butter, tossing to coat in dry ingredients as you go (alternatively pulse the dry ingredients a few time in a food processor and then pulse the bacon fat in and then the stick of butter that has been sliced into the flour Approx 20 times until coarse crumble forms)
  4. Add shredded cheese and bacon crumbles to the flour mixture, reserving some cheese and bacon for garnish.
  5. In a separate bowl whisk together the eggs and cream
  6. Stir the cream mixture into the flour and butter mixture until a soft dough forms. (If using the food processor pulse a few times until just until dough forms - being careful to not over work)
  7. Transfer dough to a lightly floured surface and knead three to four times until it comes together.
  8. Pat into a 1½”-thick disk.
  9. Cut into 8 wedges; transfer to a parchment-lined baking sheet.
  10. Brush the scones with heavy cream, sprinkle with shredded cheese and bacon crumbles.
  11. Freeze until firm, approx 20 minutes.
  12. Preheat oven to 400°F.
  13. Bake them right out the freezer until golden brown, 20–25 minutes.
  14. When the scones are cooling, make the glaze. Melt the butter in a small sauce pan. Transfer to a small bowl. Whisk in the maple syrup and salt. Continue to whisk as you sift in enough powdered sugar, to make a thick but pourable glaze. Pour the glaze over the scones, letting it run down the sides.

Ramp Butter

Makes about 2 cups

Ingredients

  • 1 lb. unsalted butter, softened
  • ½ lb. ramps, minced
  • Kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper

Directions

  1. Heat 1 Tbsp butter in a small saucepan over medium and add ramps. Let saute for about 5 minutes or until completely softened. Remove from heat and let cool completely.
  2. Transfer ramps, remaining butter,and a dash of salt and pepper to a food processor. Process until a green butter has formed (I like to keep a few chunks of ramps in my butter but you can process longer if you’d rather have it creamier). Serve right away or transfer to an airtight container and store in the fridge for up to one week.
  3. Divide the butter in half and place each blob on a sheet of plastic wrap or parchment paper. Wrap the butter in the plastic wrap, gently rolling and shaping the butter into a log, and twist the ends of the plastic. Place in a resealable plastic bag and freeze. Slice off rounds of butter as needed.

Storage notes

You can also pack compound butter into air-tight containers or even ramekins and store them in the refrigerator for about a week. The traditional method is to roll the butter into logs, either in parchment or plastic wrap, so they can be chilled and sliced. You can freeze the rolls for months and just slice off what you need and re-wrap well.


Bacon and Cheddar Scones With a Maple Butter Glaze